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Bat Species

There are a large number of bats in the world, with a population of 1,100 bats worldwide. Although the number was greater before our bat friends faced a slight popularity decrease, there is still a large number and also various different kinds, with different appearances, which make bats themselves that little bit more fascinating.

There are a large number of bats in the world, with a population of 1,100 bats worldwide. Although the number was greater before our bat friends faced a slight popularity decrease, there is still a large number of different kinds, each with different appearances, which make bats themselves that little bit more fascinating.

Alcathoe bat
This bat is the newest edition to the UK’s bat family. The Alcathoe bat was only confirmed in 2010 as a different and individual type of bat because of its similar appearance to the whiskered bat and the Brandt’s bat species.

Barbastelle
This type of bat is one of the rarest and more distinctive looking members of the bat species, with its pug-like face and large, wide ears it isn’t one to be mistaken for another.

Bechstein’s bat
The Bechstein’s bat is also one of the rarest bats around, only found in the southern parts of England and the South-East of Wales.

Brandt’s bat
This bat is very similar to the whiskered bat in appearance and isn’t one of the rarer bats. Because of the Brandt’s bat and Whiskered bat’s similar looks, the Brandt’s bat was only recognised as an individual bat type in 1970.

Brown long-eared bat
These bats have the largest ears which gives them the advantage of exceptional hearing, the hearing of a brown long-eared bat is sensitive enough to pick up the footsteps of a ladybird walking on a leaf.

Grey long-eared bat
These bats are often mistake for Long Brown-eared bats as they look extremely similar, the only thing that separates the two is the fact that the Grey Long-eared bat generally is slightly larger than the Brown Long-eared bat and has a darker face.

Common pipistrelle
These bats are the most common of all British bats. Their quirky fact is that they can eat up to 3,000 bugs in one night. This is definitely an advantage for anyone owning a bat box in their garden who is hoping to decrease the amount of pesky bugs around, interrupting their summer.

Daubenton’s bat
The Daubenton’s bat, A.K.A ‘water bat’ picks insects from the water’s surface with their tail or feet.

Greater horseshoe bat
Horseshoe bats are one of the more distinctive looking bats. They get their name from their horseshoe-shaped nose leaf.

Lesser horseshoe bat
This bat is similar in appearance to the Greater horseshoe bat, however the Lesser is able to wrap it’s wings around its entire body while at rest, which is an advantage that the Greater horseshoe bat doesn’t have.

Leisler’s bat
This bat is similar looking to the Noctule, however it has longer fur and is smaller in size.

Nathusius’ pipistrelle
The Nathusius pipistrelle bat was only confirmed as a resident species in 1997. This bat is a previous migrant species.

Natterer’s bat
This bat is able to fly slowly due to its large wings, therefore having the advantage of being able to prey on a wider variety of interests, including spiders whilst in and out of their webs.

Noctule
These bats have long and narrow wings which help them to fly fast and in a straight line.

Serotine
The Serotine bat has large wings, and flies in a flapping, leisurely way.

Soprano pipistrelle
This bat is similar to the pipistrelle in appearance; however, this bat is distinguished by its high frequency call.

Whiskered bat
The Whiskered bat is smaller than the Brandt’s bat, sharing the same long and shaggy fur coat.